Mitch McConnell: 'I believe the women' accusing Roy Moore

Michele Moreno
November 14, 2017

"I would probably have taken what Mr. Moore did to me to my grave, had it not been for the courage of four other women", she said.

Moore noted that "they" do investigations every time he runs for public office. "I thought that he was going to rape me". He has denied the allegations and has said he plans to remain in the race.

The Kentucky Republican said last week after the initial report from the Washington Post broke that if the allegations were true, then Moore should step aside.

In the past few months, President Trump has had a tumultuous relationship with Sessions, due in no small part to his frustration with the attorney general's recusal from the investigations into Russia's 2016 election interference. "Because there are groups that don't want me in the United States Senate", he said, naming the Democratic Party and the Republican establishment and accusing them of working together. Sessions to testify at hearing amid Russia scrutiny Russian social media is the modern-day Trojan horse Trump records robo-call for Gillespie: "He'll help "make America great again" MORE", he said.

"If Roy Moore committed a sin, that's a sin and that's not good, but we're not talking about an actual crime here under-that's prosecutable in 2017", he said.

If Moore wins the December 12 election, the Senate should either refuse to seat him or expel him once seated, Kinzinger said.

But a Moore victory also would pose risks if he were to join the Senate GOP with a cloud of sexual misconduct allegations.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) called for Moore to exit the race Monday morning, declaring he believed Moore's accusers and talking about a possible write-in campaign.

"Look, I'm sorry, but even before these reports surfaced, Roy Moore's nomination was a bridge too far", tweeted Sen.

"It's just really a matter as to whether he ought to be the candidate, the standard-bearer of the Republican Party", said Ohio Gov. John Kasich, on "This Week" on ABC.

"Mitch McConnell, the way he's been - this clearly felt nearly orchestrated", Todd said. And not for the party, but for the American people. "The denial was not as strong as the allegations", Scott said.

McConnell told reporters in his home state of Kentucky that party officials were considering whether a Republican write-in candidate could be found to challenge Moore in the December 12 special election. And any effort to add odd as a write-in candidate would threaten to divide the GOP vote in a way that would give the Democratic candidate a greater chance of winning.

Walker was asked in the Sunday interview if Moore should bow out of the race in the light of the allegations.

Other reports by Insurance News

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