Group linked to NSA spy leaks threatens sale of new tech secrets

Marlene Weaver
May 21, 2017

These will include monthly data dumps starting in June. "Each month peoples can be paying membership fee, then getting members only data dump each month".

They claim to own exploits for Windows 10, web browsers, network routers and also phones and even the SWIFT worldwide money transfer system.

On Tuesday, following the WannaCry attacks, the Shadow Brokers posted a new message online in which they claim to have many more Equation exploits that haven't been leaked yet.

In the blogpost which was made yesterday, the group claiming to be Shadow Brokers, said, "Shadow Brokers feels that it was "being very responsible" about April's dump-the one that resulted in WannaCrypt/WannaCry, and the potential for many more exploits." .

While the motives of the Shadow Brokers remains unknown, it claimed that it wasn't interested in the bug bounties paid by software firms for vulnerabilities found in their code or selling to "cyber thugs".

An unprecedented global cyber attack that infected computers in at least 150 countries beginning on Friday has unleashed a new wave of criticism of the U.S. National Security Agency.The attack was made possible by a flaw in Microsoft's Windows software that the NSA used to build a hacking tool for its own use - only to have that tool and others end up in the hands of a mysterious group called the Shadow Brokers, which then published them online.Microsoft Corp (MSFT.O) President Brad Smith sharply criticized the U.S. government on Sunday for "stockpiling" software flaws that it often can not protect, citing recent leaks of both NSA and CIA hacking tools. The post did not identify other products by name.

Shadow Brokers, the group that leaked parts of United States national security agency's (NSA) cyber weapons stockpile which formed the basis of the recent WannaCry ransomware, said it would release hacking tools every month to those willing to pay for it.

The leaks, and the global WannaCry virus attack, have renewed debate over how and when intelligence agencies should disclose vulnerabilities used in cyber spying programs to so that businesses and consumers can better defend themselves against attacks.

Hacking tools believed to belong to the NSA that were leaked online last month were built into WannaCry ransomware - also known as WannaCrypt - that swept the globe on Friday.

Calling themselves the Shadow Brokers, the group first appeared in 2016 claiming that they had access to 75% of the U.S. cyber arsenal, which they offered to auction to the highest bidder. However, as researcher Marcy Wheeler points out, simply threatening these leaks can strain relationships between Microsoft and the USA government, which may be the real aim. The US government has not commented directly on the matter. Microsoft president and chief legal officer Brad Smith said earlier this week the WannaCry attack used elements stolen from NSA cyber warfare operations.

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